ILFORD INSPIRES // Joe Brook ‘SKATEBOARDING IS OUR RELIGION’

Joe Brook's film ‘SKATEBOARDING IS OUR RELIGION’ is a pilgrimage to the epicenter of skateboarding, San Francisco, in Joe's iconic van ‘Big Blue’. In this rare look behind the scenes we watch Joe capture skateboarders using various photographic techniques for his work at Thrasher Magazine.


WARNING: The following film features skateboarding tricks performed by professionals. HARMAN technology and the producers insist that no one attempt to recreate or re-enact any of the activity in this film.

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Filmed and Edited by Exploredinary (Sarah Reyes and Daniel Driensky) With additional GX1000 footage by Ryan Garshell Original Music by New Fumes Joe's Subjects: Ben Gore, Corey Duffel, Max Schaaf, Ryan Garshell, Brian DeLaTorre, Yonnie Cruz, Al Davis and Andrew Torralvo End Credits photos on ILFORD HP5 Plus film by Daniel Driensky Special Thanks to Joe Brook, Ben Gore, Corey Duffel, Max Schaaf, GX1000 and Michael Bain Joe's film processed by Blue Moon Camera and Machine

Source(ILFORD Photo Youtube)

VIDEO // The Art of Storytelling by Giles Duley

ILFORD Inspires

ILFORD PHOTO (Harman Technology Ltd) presents one of this generation's greatest photographic storytellers, Giles Duley. With a special ability to connect with people and an unfaltering empathy for the plight of others, Giles Duley has become one of the world's leading documentary and humanitarian photographers. His mission - to tell the stories of those impacted by the long-term effects of conflict - all through the medium of photography. As a result, Giles has made storytelling his art.

Source (ILFORD PhotoYoutube)

INTERVIEW // JOEL MEYEROWITZ ON WHAT HE LEARNED ABOUT STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM GARRY WINOGRAND

By David Walker

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“New York City, 1963,” by Joel Meyerowitz. From 1962 to 1965, Meyerowitz and Garry Winogrand “pounded the streets every day” with their cameras cocked and ready, looking for the “fragment of perception that stimulated our consciousness,” Meyerowitz recalls.

When we asked photographers to define “street photography,” they cited the work of several photographers as examples: Helen Levitt, Eugène Atget, Diane Arbus and William Klein, among others. But the photographer most frequently mentioned is Garry Winogrand (1928-1984). To photographers who knew Winogrand personally and those who know him only through his incongruous, witty work, he epitomizes the genre. Photographer...

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Source (https://www.pdnonline.com)

Five Tips from Joel Meyerowitz

Alongside a preview of his new book, ‘Joel Meyerowitz: Where I Find Myself’, the photographer gives us a masterclass in the medium

  • TEXT Douglas Greenwood

 New York City, 1965

New York City, 1965

The street has always been a place where life unfolds unexpectedly. For the past 56 years, American photographer Joel Meyerowitz has tried his best to capture as much of it as he can.

Now considered one of the founding fathers of the medium, Meyerowitz found himself at the epicentre of a movement when he first picked up a camera in early 1960s New York City. Shooting in colour was considered crass back then – used only for commercial purposes – but as it was all that he had to hand, he was able to capture the chaos and jubilance of a generation in crisp, vibrant detail. It would be the start of a highly influential career that saw Meyerowitz create some of the most admired collections of 20th century photography, including Cape Light, his series shot over a summer in Cape Cod, Massachusetts; and his beautiful photos of shorelines at dusk in Bay/Sky.

Joel Meyerowitz: Where I Find Myself is the biggest published retrospective of his photography to date. Presented to the reader in reverse order, it chronicles Meyerowitz’s best work, from his sobering photos of a post-9/11 New York City in mourning to his romantic, mid-20th century shots of the carefree lives of those living in towns and cities across America.

“[It was] a bittersweet and yet fascinating experience to look at 50,000 photographs and say goodbye to most of them,” says Meyerowitz. All of that work brought him to where he is today. Having recently celebrated his 80th birthday, he still continues to take still-life photographs of objects he finds in the junkyards of his Tuscan town.

 New York City, 1975

New York City, 1975

Now, Meyerowitz says times have changed for street photographers – particularly those looking to capture an organic, fleeting moment. “[Back then], you could feel the sensual mix on the street,” he says. “Today, it’s very different. Most people have a cell phone to their ear, or are communicating – they think – with others. They’re somewhat distanced from the real world, so it’s not as sensual, erotic or playful as it used to be.”

That doesn’t mean modern photographers can’t adopt the style to make beautiful pictures, though. Here, Joel Meyerowitz shares five tips on how to take masterful, honest photographs of life on the street.

  1. Be prepared to act on impulse

  2. Ask yourself: ‘What am I doing out here?’

  3. Connect disconnected things

  4. Carve out your identity

  5. Be vocal

Source (http://www.anothermanmag.com)

INTERVIEW // Photographer Armin Walcher

by PETE LITTLEWOOD

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The Ausseerland, in the geographical middle of Austria, is an area of outstanding natural beauty with its crystal clear lakes and impressive mountain backdrops. Beneath its picture-postcard appearance, the region and its inhabitants preserve a strong sense of tradition and heritage, while equally embracing change and progression. Austrian Leica S photographer Armin Walcher explores this fascinating region in search of the hard-to-pin-down sense of local identity via 30 in-depth encounters with local craftspeople, musicians, and artists. The personal stories are told via images and text in the beautifully compiled book “Zeitlos in Bewegung”, while an interactive website includes compelling videos, offering more insight into the 30 individual stories. Here we feature just a few of these local characters and speak with Armin about the challenges of capturing such an elusive concept as local identity in photographic form.

 © Armin Walcher Photography

© Armin Walcher Photography

You used to be a professional athlete before you became a photographer, how did you transition from one career to the next?

It was more or less by accident. During my career as a professional athlete, I wanted to update my website with better photos. So I bought a better camera. I immediately fell in love with the feeling of photography, which I had not been able to imagine before. I really got obsessed and started to do more and more and more…

 © Armin Walcher Photography

© Armin Walcher Photography

How did your passion for photography develop? Is there anyone in particular, who influenced or inspired you along the way?

The development went from nature to sports, then to commercial, people and documentary photography. It was a process, I would say. I had to grow as a person to go more into people and documentary photography. I could not imagine that when I started to shoot. It took me some time.

Nature photography is still a learning process for me. I gain new insights each time I shoot, I keep discovering new things and I appreciate it if situations have meaning in an honest way, not in a spectacular one.

I learn a lot from each kind of photography, which keeps my life and my life as a photographer in fascinating movement. I don’t want to stand still. I want to develop. I can’t say who influenced or inspired me in particular, but my dad is a big part of my career in photography. He loves photography and always has honest feedback.

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Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com

VIDEO // Photographer PATRICK O'DELL

Many moons ago I stumbled upon this great website www.camerabag.tv. It consisted of a collection of short films on several Photographers, some famous and some not so. I don't know much more about the site as without warning the uploads stopped an as of about a year ago ... it has seaced to exist. 

Although the website has gone I have included below what images I was able to grab before it's demise. We will indevour to upload the remaining 10 shorts over the next 12 months or so

Source (this video originally appeared on www.camerabag.tv)

BOOK REVIEW // La Calle: On the Streets of Mexico

Photographs by Alex Webb
Review by Sean Sheehan

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Since joining Magnum Photos at the age of 24, Alex Webb has certainly kept himself busy. This latest volume, a handsomely produced book containing 86 photographs, gathers together work produced by Webb over the course of his numerous trips to Mexico between 1975 and 2007.

For those unfamiliar with Webb’s oeuvre, the book contains eight uncharacteristically black-and-white photographs—surprising, given Webb’s love of color. Yet these are important examples of Webb’s early work, the kind that first attracted the attention of Magnum when he was beginning his career. Despite their simplicity, it is not difficult to see what caught their attention: take his 1978 shot of a graveyard, with a boy in the foreground addressing the camera and two riders on one horse cantering by in the background. Fresh floral wreaths indicate memories of those buried here, but a cross is slowly collapsing into the ground and an old shack looks disused; memories also die, in time, and the realm of the eternally departed is framed by the temporality of the two riders and the boy who questions the viewer’s intrusive presence.

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Source (https://www.lensculture.com