VIDEO // Photographer PATRICK O'DELL

Many moons ago I stumbled upon this great website www.camerabag.tv. It consisted of a collection of short films on several Photographers, some famous and some not so. I don't know much more about the site as without warning the uploads stopped an as of about a year ago ... it has seaced to exist. 

Although the website has gone I have included below what images I was able to grab before it's demise. We will indevour to upload the remaining 10 shorts over the next 12 months or so

Source (this video originally appeared on www.camerabag.tv)

BOOK REVIEW // La Calle: On the Streets of Mexico

Photographs by Alex Webb
Review by Sean Sheehan

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Since joining Magnum Photos at the age of 24, Alex Webb has certainly kept himself busy. This latest volume, a handsomely produced book containing 86 photographs, gathers together work produced by Webb over the course of his numerous trips to Mexico between 1975 and 2007.

For those unfamiliar with Webb’s oeuvre, the book contains eight uncharacteristically black-and-white photographs—surprising, given Webb’s love of color. Yet these are important examples of Webb’s early work, the kind that first attracted the attention of Magnum when he was beginning his career. Despite their simplicity, it is not difficult to see what caught their attention: take his 1978 shot of a graveyard, with a boy in the foreground addressing the camera and two riders on one horse cantering by in the background. Fresh floral wreaths indicate memories of those buried here, but a cross is slowly collapsing into the ground and an old shack looks disused; memories also die, in time, and the realm of the eternally departed is framed by the temporality of the two riders and the boy who questions the viewer’s intrusive presence.

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Source (https://www.lensculture.com

PHOTOGRAPHER // Adrien Blondel

 I work predominantly with the photographic medium, and recently with analog photography almost exclusively. The analog process has been a great source of learning to me,  and I find it has a certain depth, a weight, that digital images don’t carry in the same way.  Adrien Blondel
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It is a common thing to think about the bedroom in which one grew up, scattered memories of a time cherished or loathed, but essential, the private space of self-development.

Most people move out and away from their childhood room, and seldom keep a link to this space, other than in their memory or photographs, where space itself is often just the background.

For some, the room has barely changed since they lived in it, and it is as if the memories settled, like dust, the room remains suspended in time, a personal museum. For others, the room has been entirely remodeled, keeping almost no traces of the memories evoked.

This series is a playful attempt at reversing the concept of photography as the representation of something that is no longer, by presenting people’s memory of their childhood bedroom, collected as an interview, with a photograph of what the room is now, creating an image that contradicts the memories evoked, and the visualization that comes from hearing them. The photographs were taken after the interview, in the hope that, consciously or not, the image will reflect on the memories that were evoked, and point at how a human presence in a place possibly leaves it changed. This process tries to acknowledge the layers present in a room, the never-ending creation of memories linked to a given space and the multitudes that pass through it, and maybe the sum of all of those memories tells us about the essence of a space. 

WEBSITE

INTERVIEW // Photographer Yukio Uchida

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Over the last few years, Fujifilm has invited professional photographers from around the world to meet with the product planning and R&D teams to discuss current and future products. Names you may or may not have heard of such as Zack Arias, David Hobby, Bert Stephani, Kevin Mullins, Gianluca Colla, Tomasz Lazar, Damien Lovegrove, Knut Koivisto, Chris Weston and more have all given their feedback and input into the “kai-zen” development mentality of the Fujifilm X system.

However, this process has actually been going on for longer than that.

Earlier in the year I was lucky enough to meet with Yukio Uchida, a famous professional photographer from Japan who had been speaking about Fujifilm cameras at the CP+ show in Yokohama. Yukio was one of the world’s first “X-Photographers”; his feedback has been instrumental in the development of the Fujifilm X system. I was able to get 10 minutes of his time to ask him a few questions about his involvement with Fujifilm R&D, and also his own photographic style.

MH: Thank you for taking some time meet me and talk about you and your photography.
Is this your first time presenting at CP+?

YU: No, this is my fourth year. Every year it gets better than previous. Four years ago very few people used X series but over time the amount of users has increased, and also the amount of people that come to watch me speak has increased.

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Source (https://fujifilm-blog.com)

INTERVIEW // 14 REASONS TO SWITCH BACK TO FILM

Ryan Neilan talks about the freeing experience of film

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Deep blacks, blown highlights, contrast heavy. Heavily influenced by the Are-Bure-Boke style from Japan, Ryan Neilan’s images are often out of focus, blurry and feature lots of heavy grain. Having shot his first roll of film back in 1999, Neilan would take pictures of his friends’ band playing in a local community center. And as he would describe it, the process of knowing how to obtain a good image got him hooked and he has been doing photography ever since. He shares his experience of changing 100% back from digital to analog and how Leica has played a key role in this unraveling process.

What approach do you take with your photography or what does photography mean to you?

I’ve always enjoyed art and music, but I have never been able to draw, to really learn an instrument well. It just didn’t click with me. But when I look at a picture, a good photograph, there’s just a feeling you get. It just clicks. I’m sure it’s the same for guitarists and painters, they just have a connection with that art form. For me it just happens to be photography.

My approach is perhaps a little different to most. I shoot film and shoot a lot of film. I shot forty rolls in five days in Tokyo. When I go out to shoot I walk quickly. I like to move quickly through the streets and people. I stop for a split second to press the shutter, barely breaking stride before moving on. I rarely talk to the people I photograph, usually I’m long gone before they have a chance to react. I can easily shoot three to five rolls in an hour and thanks to the 35mm I’m trying to get closer as I shoot.

I have stopped going out to randomly shoot as I used to and am now really focusing on projects. After the Tokyo project, my next project is based in Ho Chi Minh City. The images you see of the city are usually the over done, overly pretty tourist shots. I don’t think anyone has ever really shot this city in this darker black and white style before. I have another project in the works on the growing hardcore punk music scene that is growing here in Saigon.

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Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com)

PHOTOGRAPHER // Olivia Arthur

Interview by Helena Lee

Olivia Arthur is a British documentary photographer and member of the Magnum photography agency. Originally studying mathematics at Oxford University she later studied photojournalism at the London College of Printing. .. Wikipedea

Bazaar: What draws you to photojournalism?  

Olivia: It’s photography with more story telling. A single image can be amazing and dramatic. I started out shooting individual images for Cherwell [Oxford’s student newspaper], but I found I wanted to have more of a voice: to actually say something. I wanted to do something more personal over a long period of time, with more authorship.

Bazaar: What’s the story you are most proud of telling?

Olivia: Jeddah Diary is my first book, so I am proud of that. It was also the first time I’ve worked with both words and photographs successfully. Saudi Arabia is so conservative. At first there were photographs of women I took that I couldn’t publish – of women without their abayas [the cloak they must wear in public]. So I started writing out little anecdotes about things I couldn’t photograph and wove it in with a more obscure picture and called it “moments that got away”. I realised these worked as well as the photographs by themselves. There are a lot of photographers who feel the story is all in the photographs but I really believe in weaving in complementary words with the pictures.

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WEBSITE | MAGNUM

Source (http://www.harpersbazaar.com

INTERVIEW // Photographer Paul Struijk by Pete Littlewood

Paul Struijk explores the facial architecture of the Dutch capital with his Leica M10

Amsterdam is one of the most culturally diverse cities you will find anywhere on the planet. It was among the most important ports in the world during the Dutch Golden Age of the 17th Century and ever since then immigrants from all over the globe have come to call Amsterdam their home. Amsterdamer, Paul Struijk, set out with his LeicaM10 to document the facial archetypes of the city’s residents and, in doing so, captured the diverse yet kindred nature of humanity in all its forms.

You studied an array of subjects from biology to archaeology and even classical dance. What was it that drew you to photography?

It was the creativity of the work. I needed to create things from the inside out and have the freedom to choose what I do. I also wanted to encounter new worlds, new people and new ideas.

How would you describe your photographic style?

My aim is to document. I try to find authentic images with a mix of old school and modern approaches. I like real life. I love people and how they try to make the best of it. I am absolutely a color person but over the last 2 years with my Leica, my photography has become more and more monochrome but always with a little shade of color, a little hint of a tone.

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Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com)