Sergey Melnitchenko // Leica Oskar Barnack Award Newcomer 2017

Winner of the Leica Oskar Barnack Award Newcomer 2017 is Sergey Melnitchenko for his series „Behind the Scenes“. He receives 10,000 euros and a Leica M camera and lens.

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“There is no falsehood – it’s not staged, it’s their everyday life, our life, or rather mine.”

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Sergey Melnitchenko

Born in Mykolaiv, Ukraine in 1991, Melnitchenko has been taking photographs for around eight years. He is a member of Ukrainian Photographic Alternative, a collective promoting contemporary photography in Ukraine. He self-published his ‘Loneliness Online’ series in 2013. His work has been shown in various international solo and group exhibitions, including the Landskrona Fotofestival (2015), the Off_Festival Bratislava (2014), and in art book presentations within the framework of the artist residency The Muzychi Expanded History Project, Kiev, Ukraine. Melnitchenko has been living and working in China for the last two years.

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Source (http://www.leica-oskar-barnack-award.com

Arrivals and Departures: The Road of Bones

Danish photographer Jacob Aue Sobol plans to bring his photo series, “Arrivals and Departures,” to a close with a journey along Siberia’s “Road of Bones,” the chilling highway constructed by prisoners sent to Soviet forced labor camps between 1932 and 1953. His photographs will capture “life, solidarity, and humanity in the coldest inhabited areas on earth”:

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WE ASKED 16 PHOTOGRAPHERS: ARE YOU OPTIMISTIC FOR THE FUTURE OF PHOTOGRAPHY?

Benjamin Lowy: Of course I am. The future is innovation, and photography will change and adapt, but it will continue to be a viable artistic form. Whether one can make money from it is another question all together.

J.M. Giordano: We will always have still photography and it will always be important. This came to me while watching a doc on photography during the Vietnam War. There’s a 16mm film showing the execution of a Vietcong sympathizer by a cop. It happens very fast and the film was all but forgotten. Luckily, still photographer Eddie Adams was there to capture one of the most famous war photos of all time. No one remembers the film but EVERYONE remembers the still photograph. In reality, I’m more concerned with the future of GOOD photography. The more we accept mediocrity and fear criticism, the more we’re no longer able to judge what’s good and what’s bad. Everything isn’t awesome.”

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Source (http://www.featureshoot.com/)