VIDEO// Gerda Taro

Today would mark Gerda Taro's 108th Birthday. Gerda Taro was a German war photographer, and the companion and professional partner of photographer Robert Capa. Taro is regarded as the first female photojournalist to cover the front lines of a war and to die while doing so. Wikipedia

Gerda Taro was a pioneering and largely unknown female photojournalist whose work consisted almost exclusively of dramatic photographs from the Spanish Civil War. Irme Schaber, Taro's biographer and curator of the current exhibition at the Barbican will present and talk about a wide selection of Taro's work. Gerda Taro (1910-37) worked alongside Robert Capa, who was her photographic as well as romantic partner and the two collaborated closely. Her photographs were widely reproduced in the French press and incorporated the dynamic camera angles of New Vision photography as well as a physical and emotional closeness to her subject. While covering the crucial battle of Brunete in July 1937, Taro was struck by a tank and killed. Irme Schaber is a writer and lecturer on the history of exile photography, photojournalism and print-media. She is currently researching the work and lives of Hansel Mieth and Otto Hagel, two important German refugee photographers who were some of the earliest photographers for Life magazine.

Source (Frontline Club Youtube)

INTERVIEW // Photographer Armin Walcher

by PETE LITTLEWOOD

Zeitlos in Bewegung – © Armin Walcher Photography 3.jpg

The Ausseerland, in the geographical middle of Austria, is an area of outstanding natural beauty with its crystal clear lakes and impressive mountain backdrops. Beneath its picture-postcard appearance, the region and its inhabitants preserve a strong sense of tradition and heritage, while equally embracing change and progression. Austrian Leica S photographer Armin Walcher explores this fascinating region in search of the hard-to-pin-down sense of local identity via 30 in-depth encounters with local craftspeople, musicians, and artists. The personal stories are told via images and text in the beautifully compiled book “Zeitlos in Bewegung”, while an interactive website includes compelling videos, offering more insight into the 30 individual stories. Here we feature just a few of these local characters and speak with Armin about the challenges of capturing such an elusive concept as local identity in photographic form.

 © Armin Walcher Photography

© Armin Walcher Photography

You used to be a professional athlete before you became a photographer, how did you transition from one career to the next?

It was more or less by accident. During my career as a professional athlete, I wanted to update my website with better photos. So I bought a better camera. I immediately fell in love with the feeling of photography, which I had not been able to imagine before. I really got obsessed and started to do more and more and more…

 © Armin Walcher Photography

© Armin Walcher Photography

How did your passion for photography develop? Is there anyone in particular, who influenced or inspired you along the way?

The development went from nature to sports, then to commercial, people and documentary photography. It was a process, I would say. I had to grow as a person to go more into people and documentary photography. I could not imagine that when I started to shoot. It took me some time.

Nature photography is still a learning process for me. I gain new insights each time I shoot, I keep discovering new things and I appreciate it if situations have meaning in an honest way, not in a spectacular one.

I learn a lot from each kind of photography, which keeps my life and my life as a photographer in fascinating movement. I don’t want to stand still. I want to develop. I can’t say who influenced or inspired me in particular, but my dad is a big part of my career in photography. He loves photography and always has honest feedback.

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Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com

WECC MEMBER // Nick Bedford - Photo Vol. 120

WECC Member Nick Bedford has posted his latest set of awesome images over at his Journal page at nickbedford.com. Always a treat, his latest film frenzy shows of some great Kodak Portra and Ektar 100 colour work along with the norm Tri-X variants and some Rolleiflex Ilford HP5+ action.. worth a look. ENJOY

Since I seem to be shooting both black and white and colour a lot now, I'm renaming these posts to simply Photo Vol. X. Seems more fitting and flexible. The Rolleiflex has been great, though I need to put it to more use with some Kodak Portra colour film and make some new portraits with it. The Leica M7 is still down in Melbourne at the servicing shop, though I have some recent 35mm Portra 160 photographs from a camping trip I went on with my mate Dash before I sent it away.
We managed to get the Pakon F135+ to scan raw TIFFs of colour film and the results are quite astounding, even despite the limited resolution of the scanner (6 megapixels). The latitude in colour film is amazing.

VIDEO // Photographer PATRICK O'DELL

Many moons ago I stumbled upon this great website www.camerabag.tv. It consisted of a collection of short films on several Photographers, some famous and some not so. I don't know much more about the site as without warning the uploads stopped an as of about a year ago ... it has seaced to exist. 

Although the website has gone I have included below what images I was able to grab before it's demise. We will indevour to upload the remaining 10 shorts over the next 12 months or so

Source (this video originally appeared on www.camerabag.tv)

VIDEO // Testing The Exposure Limits Of Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Pro 400H, Kodak's Portra 400

Fantastic set of vids from Kyle McDougall . Great production value and insightful, Make certain to Subscribe to his Youtube channel.

Colour Negative Film exposure tests,  looking at Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Pro 400H and Kodak's Portra 400. 

Source (Kyle McDougall Youtube)

INTERVIEW // Photographer Iain Sarjeant

By Grant Scott

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Iain Sarjeant is a photographer based in the Highlands of Scotland who founded the Another Place Press as a small independent publisher to showcase contemporary landscape photography. To date he has published nine books that explore landscape covering themes documenting the land, place, journey, city and environment from the remotest corners of the globe to the centre of the largest cities. It’s an ambitious premise and even more so as the imprint consists of just one employee. Iain is that employee and his responsibilities include all aspects of publishing the books, running the blog, all social media and continuing to work as a commissioned photographer as well as progressing his personal projects. Despite this he spared sometime to talk with Grant Scott about the current independent publishing landscape and his personal experiences in establishing his own publishing company.

Grant: I hear and read a lot of discussion amongst photographers about photobooks but very little about publishing, which is something we are all doing every day even if we are not aware of it. Every time we write a tweet or post on Facebook or Instagram we are publishing, but the art and complexity of publishing is rarely understood. I’m also not sure if photographers are comfortable with being referred to as publishers.
Iain: It’s become relatively easy to produce a photobook which is exciting, but I think there is a need to think through the process carefully, in particular how to sell decent quantities of a book, if that is the goal. In many ways, the marketing and selling is the most challenging part of the process. I have a background in graphic design and a knowledge of the print and design process – I am comfortable handling everything in-house and have decent connections with printers, but I’m no publishing expert. Another Place Press developed out of the Another Place blog, which I started a few years ago, and right from the start I hoped that it would develop into a publishing project. I was inspired by small publishers such as The Velvet Cell www.thevelvetcell.com, I loved what they do – Eanna has a real eye for design. I also feel design is very important – of course a book needs a strong series of photographs that work well, but you cannot underestimate the importance of design.

Grant: There seems to be a strong collaborative sense amongst independent publishers.
Iain: Absolutely, Eanna, the founder of The Velvet Cell was very supportive in helping me establish Another Place even though I could be seen as a potential competitor. Craig Atkinson at Café Royal is producing great books and I know Al Palmer at Brown Owl Press, but there are not that many publishers releasing the kind of small books we are producing. I started with small books partly for financial reasons, but I do like their size – good quality small books produced at a reasonable price that everyone can afford. I very much like the idea of them being affordable, accessible to all.

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Source (https://unitednationsofphotography.com)