INTERVIEW // Photographer Paul Struijk by Pete Littlewood

Paul Struijk explores the facial architecture of the Dutch capital with his Leica M10

Amsterdam is one of the most culturally diverse cities you will find anywhere on the planet. It was among the most important ports in the world during the Dutch Golden Age of the 17th Century and ever since then immigrants from all over the globe have come to call Amsterdam their home. Amsterdamer, Paul Struijk, set out with his LeicaM10 to document the facial archetypes of the city’s residents and, in doing so, captured the diverse yet kindred nature of humanity in all its forms.

You studied an array of subjects from biology to archaeology and even classical dance. What was it that drew you to photography?

It was the creativity of the work. I needed to create things from the inside out and have the freedom to choose what I do. I also wanted to encounter new worlds, new people and new ideas.

How would you describe your photographic style?

My aim is to document. I try to find authentic images with a mix of old school and modern approaches. I like real life. I love people and how they try to make the best of it. I am absolutely a color person but over the last 2 years with my Leica, my photography has become more and more monochrome but always with a little shade of color, a little hint of a tone.

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Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com)

"Great Journeys" Magnum Photos Square Print Sale with Aperture Foundation

October 30, 8 A.M. EST to November 3, 6 P.M. EST only
Signed or estate-stamped, 6x6" museum quality prints for $100

Band member at parade. Bangalore, India. 2016 © Alec Soth / Magnum Photos

I recently went to India to study ‘laughter yoga’ in hopes of learning how to make happy pictures. But my best photograph still ended up looking a little sad.” - Alec Soth

On the occasion of Magnum’s 70th anniversary and Aperture Foundation’s 65th, the two storied organizations have joined forces to present Great Journeys, inspired by Magnum co-founder, the photographer George Rodger.

Rodger’s response to the experience of World War II, and in particular his revulsion to photographing scenes of the Holocaust, led him to re-evaluate his purpose as a photographer. After the war, Rodger chose to travel in search of pictures that offered visions of hope for humanity.

Cheshire, Ohio II. 2004 © Mitch Epstein courtesy Aperture

I went to Cheshire, Ohio, in 2003 to make pictures of a town that had been bought out by American Electric Power. The townspeople had been complaining of toxic contamination from the local coal-fired power plant, and had agreed, for a price, to keep silent and never sue AEP. It was when I returned home to New York, and couldn’t get Cheshire and its residents out of my mind, that I began the series ‘American Power,’ in an effort to understand how energy functions: who makes it; who and what gets hurt by it; who profits from it; and what might be its, and therefore the nation’s, future.” - Mitch Epstein

Magnum Photos and Aperture have a long and diverse shared history, and together have invited photographers - either members of Magnum or published by Aperture, and often, both - to respond to the theme Great Journeys with an image from their archive, as well as accompanying text.

Scotty’s Drive in. Florida. 1967 © Joel Meyerowitz courtesy Aperture

Here’s Scotty’s Sometimes when you’re traveling in the car all day, on the lookout for life on the fly, a great thirst comes over you and that desire for the next event evaporates immediately upon seeing an old-fashioned diner, I mean the real thing, not some dolled-up imitation serving prepackaged crap, but a place where some degree of reverence for the past lets you know that a milkshake from childhood can be found there. And here’s Scotty’s. Mmmmmm”

Both individually and collectively, their responses highlight the major visual and thematic threads that have preoccupied the past seven decades of photographic production, shedding light on Rodger’s legacy, and redefining the concept of journey in photographic terms.

These photographs are a selection from this project and is temporarily available for purchase as a signed, museum quality Magnum Square Print, exceptionally priced at just $100.

Liberation Day Tea at the Forest United Methodist Church. Guernsey. 2012 © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos

The Channel Islands were the only part of Britain that were taken over by the Nazis during the Second World War. They were liberated on May 9, 1945: This day is now called Liberation Day and continues to be celebrated on all of the islands every year. I had wanted to shoot the events around May 9 in the Channel Islands for many years and did so in 2012, travelling to the Islands to make pictures of the 68th anniversary celebrations of the liberation. This is an image from a 'Liberation Tea' at a small Methodist church on Guernsey, a day when Union Jacks are ubiquitous.” - Martin Parr

The edition is not limited by quantity, but limited by time. This Square Print is only available for purchase between October 30, 2017, at 8 A.M. EST and November 3, 2017, at 6 P.M. EST.

All signed Magnum Square Prints are signed on either the front or back, depending on the photographer's preference. Estate-stamped prints are stamped on the back. Each photographer's accompanying text is printed on an archival label that is affixed to the back of the print.

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EXHIBITION // Hull Portrait of a City, British teens by Martin Parr and Olivia Arthur

If your lucky enough to be in Britain this October, check this one out.......

Image: Ross and Ryan © Olivia Arthur / Magnum Photos

Image: Ross and Ryan © Olivia Arthur / Magnum Photos

Hull UK City of Culture have partnered with international photography co-operative Magnum photos to create this bespoke exhibition, commissioning Martin Parr and Olivia Arthur to explore the culture and creativity of Hull. The exhibition highlights the qualities that have made the city stand apart in an unforgettable year of culture.

Hull, Portrait of a City owns the discussion about where, what and how. How might we define Hull? How has culture changed our landscape and regenerated our city? What impact has it had on everything from economy to civic pride? How do we record it? As stories merge and new ones begin, we start looking to the future and exploring what’s next.

Magnum Photos is a photographic cooperative of great diversity and distinction owned by its photographer-members. Magnum photographers chronicle the world and interpret its peoples, events, issues and personalities. Through its four editorial offices in New York, London, Paris and Tokyo, Magnum Photos provides photographs to the press, publishers, advertising, television, galleries and museums across the world.

13 Oct - 31 Dec | 10am - 6pm

 

EXHIBITION

Source (http://www.dazeddigital.com)(http://www.humberstreetgallery.co.uk

INTERVIEW // With The Heavy Collective

Interview by Patricia Karallis

From the beginning, The Heavy Collective has been about
contributing to a global conversation around image making
and the publication leans on that same idea.

Sydney based The Heavy Collective started as an online platform showcasing interviews, features and more with photographers whose work display a breadth of subjective and conceptual ideas. Continuing their format from online to offline, they successfully crowdfunded their first print edition and are back with Heavy Vol. II.

Featuring artists Irina Rozovsky, Joanna Piotrowska, Daniel Shea, Mark Peckmezian, Aglaia Konrad, Curran Hatleberg, Deanna Templeton, Dana Lixenberg, Susan Lipper, Stephen Shames, Yoshinori Mizutani and Katrin Koenning, the latest edition is ‘a compendium of contemporary photography focusing on the conversation; Heavy Volume II is in an exploration of image and text on the printed page'(1). 

We spoke to founder Jack Harries about his beginnings with photography, his publishing and editing processes and future plans for The Heavy Collective.

Could you tell us a bit about your background and where your interest in photography came from?

I grew up in a creative environment, my mother was a painter and a sculpture and often used a camera. I taught myself photography as a teenager, but didn’t take it seriously until I was in my mid 20’s. I wasn’t great in school as a teen and ended up having my time there cut short; as much as The Heavy Collective is a space to spotlight other photographers work, it’s also been a way of giving myself the education I might of missed, albeit a very focused one.

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Source (http://paper-journal.com)

Panoramic Stitching In A Few Simple Steps | Landscape Photography

With Member Nick Bedford

In a recent video, I was asked how I shot and merged my panoramic landscape photographs. In this video, I explain how to set up your tripod for the most accurate series of frames in a series that can then be brought into Adobe Lightroom and stitched using the Merge to Panorama feature.

Cameras: Nikon D810 & Leica M Typ 240 Lenses: Sigma ART 50mm F1.4 & Leica 35mm Summarit f/2.5 Filters: 82mm Kenko Circular Polariser Tripod: Manfrotto Befree with Novoflex Panning Base Shot on Panasonic LUMIX LX10 with RODE SmartLav+ lapel mic. Edited in Final Cut Pro X.

Source (Nick Bedford Youtube)

John Malkovich x Squarespace. Make Your Next Move: Longform

Although not a photo essay this is a beautifully shot example of wonderful imagery to tell a story. Inspirational in its placement and thought of composition, something any image maker can take somethimng from.

From actor to fashion designer, see how John Malkovich is making his next move. John Malkovich and Squarespace collaborated to create a custom online store for JOHNMALKOVICH.COM

Interview // Photographer Mahtab Hussain

Interview by Nina Manandhar 

Nine years in the making, Mahtab Hussain‘s latest exhibition ‘You Get Me?’ is both a testimony to the amount of time required to create a body of work of this breadth but also to his own artistic commitment to a line of enquiry. What began as series of chance encounters on the streets of his hometown of Birmingham in 2008 evolved into a journey across the UK on a mission to create a fuller picture of what it means to be a British muslim working class man today.

Hussain sees his work as firmly rooted in a tradition of British portraiture, citing his time working at the National Portrait Gallery and his MA at Goldsmiths in Art History where he specialised in Post Colonial studies as equally influential in shaping his understanding of transformative possibilities in art, but also enabling him to experience first hand the lack of work reflecting the British – Asian experience. Seen together, they explain his drive to pursue projects which create a place for his subjects in visual history, to fill a gap where representation is either missing or a product of misinformation.

With his subjects now immortalised in an upcoming book published by Mack alongside the exhibition this May at Autograph ABP, his term long-term engagement with the community and empathy with his sitters has clearly paid off, ‘I don’t think work can be made any other way, it is about getting to know one another, sharing stories’ he tells me. Ahead of the show, we spoke to Hussain about the enduring power of fine art portraiture, masculinity in the 21st Century and the complex relationship between identity, heritage and displacement, themes which his work navigates.

The release for the exhibition describes the portraits as exploring the identity of young ‘Working class’ – rather than just ‘Asian’ men. Can you talk a little about the idea of ‘class’, ‘working class’ and why it’s an important factor in the work?

I believe class plays a critical role in understanding the work. In general, the working class communities of Britain have had to go through real change, essentially from the 80’s onwards which itself was an incredibly destructive time for British society as a whole. Margaret Thatcher and her government purposely broke down community and fostered the idea that there is no such thing as society, livelihoods were destroyed and the unions were dismantled. We were told we should embrace the individual in Britain and the self-made man and woman, which was in direct conflict with the working class concept of community, sisterhood, brotherhood and family. From a migrant perspective, this notion of individualism crushed one of the defining pillars of their culture too, one that advocated for a strong, supportive, collective society, so this era jarred with them considerably as they eventually experienced the same loss of community and society, alongside harbouring feelings of alienation.

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Source (http://paper-journal.com)