UNDERSTANDING SHUTTER SPEED, APERTURE, FILM SPEED (ISO) & THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THEM

I’ve thought about covering off some of the basic principles of photography a few times on this website, but often find myself coming to the conclusion that someone else will have done a better job. The problem is, when I’m asked questions about some of the basics, most of the links I find online are so heavily based on digital photography, that I worry they create confusion in those looking to approach learning photography via analogue mediums.

As such, nearly 6 years into running this website, I thought I might put together a few articles on some of the basic principles of photography from, but talk about them in the context of analogue rather than digital. This first article is to focus on three key variables in photography: shutter speed, aperture and ISO (film speed), and the relationship between them.

EXPOSURE

The first thing to understand about these three variables is that if you strip a camera back to its most basic function, shutter speed, aperture and film speed are the only things beyond light itself that you need to understand to take a photo. These three variables amount to what’s called “Exposure”.

Exposure defines how light or dark a photo will be. With there being three variables, the relationship between them is often referred to as the “Exposure Triangle”. By understanding the exposure triangle it is not only possible to achieve correct exposure, but it also opens the up doors to creativity within photography.

It’s worth noting at this stage that the concept of “Correct Exposure” is a very deep hole – so for the sake of this post, let’s just assume we always want to achieve an even distribution of light, mid and dark tones across our photo.  This is about the most simple definition of correct exposure I can think of. As a definition, it overlooks many potential creative goals – but the point is here, to obtain the correct exposure, it is important to understand all three of the key variables, and indeed the relationship between them.

But, before we get to the relationship between them, it’s useful to understand how each one of the variables has a different impact on how your photo will look. To understand how they impact the photo, the best place to start is to understand what they do and how they work.

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Source (https://www.35mmc.com)

Scanning Film With Your DSLR with Matt Day

I've recently changed up my method of scanning film and have been really happy with the results. I went from years of scanning with an Epson V600 to using my Fujifilm X-T3 and a macro lens. Today, I'm breaking down the entire process from start to finish.

I've recently changed up my method of scanning film and have been really happy with the results. I went from years of scanning with an Epson V600 to using my Fujifilm X-T3 and a macro lens. Today, I'm breaking down the entire process from start to finish.

Source (Matt Day Youtube)

VIDEO // Scanning Film With VueScan + Epson Scan Comparison

In this video, I go over my film scanning workflow using VueScan software and an Epson V500 and then compare the results with Epson Scan. I've only been using VueScan for a short period of time, but I've been incredibly happy with the results, and feel like I finally have a workflow for scanning at home that produces the results that I'm after.

Source ( Youtube)

TUTORIAL // Processing Black & White Film

  • We suggest NOT using a squeegee on negatives ...ever.

These simple step by step instructions will teach you all you need to know to start processing your own black & white films at home.

  • Part 1: What you will need 00:09
  • Part 2: Preparing the chemicals 01:06
  • Part 3: Loading your film 02:06
  • Part 4: Processing your film 04:02
  • Part 5: Hanging and Drying your film 06:48

Source (ILFORD Photo Youtube)

VIDEO // PROCESSING B&W

Seeing as a potential Film Workshop is on the cards ...something to wet your appetite ...

These simple step by step instructions will teach you all you need to know to start processing your own black & white films at home.

  • Part 1: What you will need 00:09
  • Part 2: Preparing the chemicals 01:06
  • Part 3: Loading your film 02:06
  • Part 4: Processing your film 04:02
  • Part 5: Hanging and Drying your film

 

Source (V Youtube)

Panoramic Stitching In A Few Simple Steps | Landscape Photography

With Member Nick Bedford

In a recent video, I was asked how I shot and merged my panoramic landscape photographs. In this video, I explain how to set up your tripod for the most accurate series of frames in a series that can then be brought into Adobe Lightroom and stitched using the Merge to Panorama feature.

Cameras: Nikon D810 & Leica M Typ 240 Lenses: Sigma ART 50mm F1.4 & Leica 35mm Summarit f/2.5 Filters: 82mm Kenko Circular Polariser Tripod: Manfrotto Befree with Novoflex Panning Base Shot on Panasonic LUMIX LX10 with RODE SmartLav+ lapel mic. Edited in Final Cut Pro X.

Source (Nick Bedford Youtube)

Simulating Kodak Tri-X Black & White Film

By Nick Bedford

In the last six months, my approach to photography has changed a great deal, leading me to switch to film for most of my black and white work. The process of shooting film, from the tactility of the Leica M7 and Nikon FA cameras I use, to the developing and scanning process have given me a much deeper appreciation for the craft of being a photographer.

The issue I face after becoming so accustomed to the rich, grainy texture and tonal range of Kodak's much-beloved TRI-X 400 (400TX) film is that my work has become a sea of monochrome.

I've created some of my best black and white work this year alone, but my long-held desire to carry only a single camera has made it difficult to create both colour and black and white photographs at the same time.

Being able to shoot my digital Leica M Typ 240 and still achieve the feeling of Kodak Tri-X at same time as producing colour work is something I have been reaching for with a new effort to simulate, exactly, the look of 400TX. It has taken me a few months, but I think it's ready.

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Source (https://www.nickbedford.com