ILFORD INSPIRES // Joe Brook ‘SKATEBOARDING IS OUR RELIGION’

Joe Brook's film ‘SKATEBOARDING IS OUR RELIGION’ is a pilgrimage to the epicenter of skateboarding, San Francisco, in Joe's iconic van ‘Big Blue’. In this rare look behind the scenes we watch Joe capture skateboarders using various photographic techniques for his work at Thrasher Magazine.


WARNING: The following film features skateboarding tricks performed by professionals. HARMAN technology and the producers insist that no one attempt to recreate or re-enact any of the activity in this film.

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Filmed and Edited by Exploredinary (Sarah Reyes and Daniel Driensky) With additional GX1000 footage by Ryan Garshell Original Music by New Fumes Joe's Subjects: Ben Gore, Corey Duffel, Max Schaaf, Ryan Garshell, Brian DeLaTorre, Yonnie Cruz, Al Davis and Andrew Torralvo End Credits photos on ILFORD HP5 Plus film by Daniel Driensky Special Thanks to Joe Brook, Ben Gore, Corey Duffel, Max Schaaf, GX1000 and Michael Bain Joe's film processed by Blue Moon Camera and Machine

Source(ILFORD Photo Youtube)

VIDEO // Scanning Film With VueScan + Epson Scan Comparison

In this video, I go over my film scanning workflow using VueScan software and an Epson V500 and then compare the results with Epson Scan. I've only been using VueScan for a short period of time, but I've been incredibly happy with the results, and feel like I finally have a workflow for scanning at home that produces the results that I'm after.

Source ( Youtube)

WECC MEMBER // Nick Bedford - Photo Vol. 120

WECC Member Nick Bedford has posted his latest set of awesome images over at his Journal page at nickbedford.com. Always a treat, his latest film frenzy shows of some great Kodak Portra and Ektar 100 colour work along with the norm Tri-X variants and some Rolleiflex Ilford HP5+ action.. worth a look. ENJOY

Since I seem to be shooting both black and white and colour a lot now, I'm renaming these posts to simply Photo Vol. X. Seems more fitting and flexible. The Rolleiflex has been great, though I need to put it to more use with some Kodak Portra colour film and make some new portraits with it. The Leica M7 is still down in Melbourne at the servicing shop, though I have some recent 35mm Portra 160 photographs from a camping trip I went on with my mate Dash before I sent it away.
We managed to get the Pakon F135+ to scan raw TIFFs of colour film and the results are quite astounding, even despite the limited resolution of the scanner (6 megapixels). The latitude in colour film is amazing.

VIDEO // Testing The Exposure Limits Of Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Pro 400H, Kodak's Portra 400

Fantastic set of vids from Kyle McDougall . Great production value and insightful, Make certain to Subscribe to his Youtube channel.

Colour Negative Film exposure tests,  looking at Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Pro 400H and Kodak's Portra 400. 

Source (Kyle McDougall Youtube)

INTERVIEW // 14 REASONS TO SWITCH BACK TO FILM

Ryan Neilan talks about the freeing experience of film

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Deep blacks, blown highlights, contrast heavy. Heavily influenced by the Are-Bure-Boke style from Japan, Ryan Neilan’s images are often out of focus, blurry and feature lots of heavy grain. Having shot his first roll of film back in 1999, Neilan would take pictures of his friends’ band playing in a local community center. And as he would describe it, the process of knowing how to obtain a good image got him hooked and he has been doing photography ever since. He shares his experience of changing 100% back from digital to analog and how Leica has played a key role in this unraveling process.

What approach do you take with your photography or what does photography mean to you?

I’ve always enjoyed art and music, but I have never been able to draw, to really learn an instrument well. It just didn’t click with me. But when I look at a picture, a good photograph, there’s just a feeling you get. It just clicks. I’m sure it’s the same for guitarists and painters, they just have a connection with that art form. For me it just happens to be photography.

My approach is perhaps a little different to most. I shoot film and shoot a lot of film. I shot forty rolls in five days in Tokyo. When I go out to shoot I walk quickly. I like to move quickly through the streets and people. I stop for a split second to press the shutter, barely breaking stride before moving on. I rarely talk to the people I photograph, usually I’m long gone before they have a chance to react. I can easily shoot three to five rolls in an hour and thanks to the 35mm I’m trying to get closer as I shoot.

I have stopped going out to randomly shoot as I used to and am now really focusing on projects. After the Tokyo project, my next project is based in Ho Chi Minh City. The images you see of the city are usually the over done, overly pretty tourist shots. I don’t think anyone has ever really shot this city in this darker black and white style before. I have another project in the works on the growing hardcore punk music scene that is growing here in Saigon.

READ & SEE MORE

Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com)

LOCAL NEWS // Racquet Film Public Darkroom FUNDRAISER

We at WECC have been great fans of everything Racquet Films do, and getting a Public Darkroom off the ground is something we are going to cheer and yell about. With a few more "secrets" in the works, this is just the start of what we hope is a great ANALOG revival for all Brisbane Film Fans. We call all to arms and encourage all FILM shooters to help get this well-needed service off the ground ....workshop anyone.

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Racquet Film began as a comission-free agency to help photographers make more money without paying fees. We've since expanded rapidly, with the opening of our full service lab (C41, B&W, E6 in 135, 120 and 220 formats, all done in-house). The demand for a public darkroom has become apparent, and the building directly next door of Racquet Film's lab and gallery is currently on hold. Racquet Film are willing to match the amount donated to cover the $18,000 bill to rent the space, and are taking donations to build a pro-grade darkroom that the entire Brisbane community can use. We'd be so greatful for any donation, big or small, whether it be money or darkroom equipment. Having spent four months in the shop, we've witnessed first hand the growth of film in Brisbane, and we want to continue to nurture this advancement, and think the expansion of services for the Racquet community is an amazing way to do this. 

100% of the funds will go toward darkroom equipment, associated bills and the other expenses it takes to make a professional darkroom worthy of public use. As previously mentioned, any donations would be greatly appreciated, and we are truly passionate about advancing film photography in Brisbane (the old school way).

Thanks in advance for your support, and feel free to contact us with any questions or suggestions.

DONATE NOW

VIDEO // PROCESSING B&W

Seeing as a potential Film Workshop is on the cards ...something to wet your appetite ...

These simple step by step instructions will teach you all you need to know to start processing your own black & white films at home.

  • Part 1: What you will need 00:09
  • Part 2: Preparing the chemicals 01:06
  • Part 3: Loading your film 02:06
  • Part 4: Processing your film 04:02
  • Part 5: Hanging and Drying your film

 

Source (V Youtube)