Sigma DP Quatro

Cut_01_A-1-680x510.jpg

Sigma is updating their point and shoot line with what they’re called their dp Quatro series. The new cameras were apparently redesigned to incorporate a new sensor, body, lens and processor. Like their predecessors there will be three cameras: the DP1, DP2, and DP3. All of them will have f2.8 lenses that equate to 28mm, 45mm and 75mm accordingly. When we tested the DP3, we were blown away by the quality that the lens and sensor combo gave us though at first being a tad hesitant about the camera.

READ & SEE MORE

Source (http://www.thephoblographer.com/)

Gear News // Why Everyone Needs an 85mm Lens

During the course of time that I’ve been a photographer, I’ve blogged about the 50mm lens and just how incredibly useful it is. Overtime though, the  85mm F1.8  for Canon has steadily become my go to lens for many situations. Not only is it sharp, delivers wonderful color and very useful, but it gives a different perspective on the things you photograph.     The Ideal Portrait Length   85mm is the ideal portrait length because it maintains closeness to your subject without showing any distortion. Distortion, or lack thereof,  is what is important to all photographers to ensure that things like noses don’t seem too big. Additionally, 85mm lenses tend to be very sharp and render the background out of focus in a way that is pleasing to the eyes. This is very useful when shooting headshots in the studio with subjects.      READ & SEE MORE

During the course of time that I’ve been a photographer, I’ve blogged about the 50mm lens and just how incredibly useful it is. Overtime though, the 85mm F1.8 for Canon has steadily become my go to lens for many situations. Not only is it sharp, delivers wonderful color and very useful, but it gives a different perspective on the things you photograph.

 

The Ideal Portrait Length

85mm is the ideal portrait length because it maintains closeness to your subject without showing any distortion. Distortion, or lack thereof,  is what is important to all photographers to ensure that things like noses don’t seem too big. Additionally, 85mm lenses tend to be very sharp and render the background out of focus in a way that is pleasing to the eyes. This is very useful when shooting headshots in the studio with subjects.

READ & SEE MORE

Source (http://www.thephoblographer.com/)

Battle of the Street Photography Focal Lengths: 24mm 35mm 50mm or 85mm

The Secret Identity

The Secret Identity

It’s a debate that has been going on for ages: which is the best lens focal length for street photography? While one can easily say, “To each their own,” there are significant pros and cons to each focal length that should be considered. Also, one must keep in mind that the most important thing is still the photographer who takes the photos. But with that said, without the right tools, you may not be able to get the job done. You wouldn’t use a screwdriver to flip a pancake, now would you?

So let’s explore the 24mm, 35mm, 50mm and 85mm focal lengths for street photography.

READ & SEE MORE

Source (http://www.thephoblographer.com)

Interview // Photographer Dan Zvereff

We first read about Dan Zvereff on Japan Camera Hunter, we were captivated by his images and his use of Kodak Aerochrome. The famous infrared film was designed for military applications and what it did was turn all greens into a shade of purple. But that’s just the short explanation, and we’ve got a more detailed and in depth analysis here.

Aerochrome was at the heart of Dan’s project called Introspective, where he travelled around the world for three months on a quest of self-discovery. Along the way he shot various landscapes and scenes in the Arctic, Europe, and Africa.

We talked to Dan a bit about the project and his incredible images.

Phoblographer: What attracted you to using the Kodak Aerochrome film to begin with?

Dan: I was at the lab with a friend who had taken some photos of tea fields in Darjeeling, India using 35mm Aerochrome. Only 1 or 2 frames survived un­fogged but looking at them on the lightbox was pure magic. I was already familiar with Richard Mosse’s outstanding documentation of the Congo so the combination of the two sort of sealed the deal. I contacted Dean Bennici shortly thereafter and discovered that he only had 100 rolls left. The fact a film that was so visually stunning that has a unique look because of the way it reacts to the chlorophyl in plants was on its last leg even furthered my conviction for using it in a project.

READ & SEE MORE

Source (http://www.thephoblographer.com)