Remembering Robert Frank, 1924-2019

Written by Hannah Abel-Hirsch and Marigold Warner

A letter that Robert Frank sent to Jim Goldberg following their first meeting. Courtesy of Jim Goldberg

A letter that Robert Frank sent to Jim Goldberg following their first meeting. Courtesy of Jim Goldberg

Robert Frank’s The Americans greatly influenced the course of 20th and 21st-century photography. His contemporaries, and those who followed, reflect on the enduring significance of his work

Robert Frank, the influential photographer known for capturing the hardships of everyday life, died on Monday, aged 94, in Nova Scotia, Canada. He is perhaps best known for his seminal photobook The Americans, which left an indelible mark on the generations of photographers who followed. The project was unique in its refusal to romanticise. It captured the poverty and suffering of post-war America with unprecedented candidness, revealing a country ravaged by poverty, racism and the rise of consumerist culture.

Frank was born in Switzerland on 09 November 1924 and immigrated to New York aged 23. In 1955, he was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship and embarked on several road trips across the US, occasionally accompanied by his first wife, the visual artist Mary Frank, and their two children, Pablo and Andrea. Frank’s 10,000-mile road trip spanned 26 states. He shot a total of 767 rolls of film; over the course of a year, 27,000 images would be annotated, tacked to walls, ripped apart, grouped together, and eventually sequenced into a series of 83 photographs, which formed The Americans.

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Source (https://www.bjp-online.com)

BOOK REVIEW // CAFE ROYAL BOOKS - Bill Jay — British Photographers Photographed

PURCHASE

Published to accompany the documentary film and exhibition: Do Not Bend: The Photographic Life of Bill Jay

VIDEO // The Photobook: A History | Tate Talks

MARTIN PAR

Published on 18 Aug 2016

According to Martin Parr (born 1952) the Photobook is the ‘supreme platform’ for photographers to disseminate their work to a mass audience. The increase in self-publishing platforms, specific prizes for photobooks, and a growing body of collectors is testament to the growth of the photobook genre within photographic practice.

This discussion marked the launch of The Photobook: A History, Volume III. Hear Martin Parr and co author Gerry Badger in conversation with Simon Baker, Curator of photography and international art at Tate, and Hannah Watson of Trolley Books.

Source (Tate Talks

Photographer // MARTIN PARR : COMMON SENSE

Born in 1952 in Epsom, Surrey (England), Martin Parr was graduated from photography at Manchester Polytechnic in 1973. In 1994, he became a full member of Magnum Photographic Corporation and was guest artistic director for Rencontres d’Arles in 2004 and for New York Photo Festival in 2008.

A photographer, a filmmaker and a collector of miscellaneous objects, Martin Parr has developed an international reputation for his innovative imagery, his oblique approach to social documentary, and his input to photographic culture within the UK and abroad.

 

MARTIN PARR : COMMON SENSE

MARTIN PARR : COMMON SENSE

MARTIN PARR : COMMON SENSE

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Website

Source (http://www.galerieparisbeijing.com)