UNDERSTANDING SHUTTER SPEED, APERTURE, FILM SPEED (ISO) & THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THEM

I’ve thought about covering off some of the basic principles of photography a few times on this website, but often find myself coming to the conclusion that someone else will have done a better job. The problem is, when I’m asked questions about some of the basics, most of the links I find online are so heavily based on digital photography, that I worry they create confusion in those looking to approach learning photography via analogue mediums.

As such, nearly 6 years into running this website, I thought I might put together a few articles on some of the basic principles of photography from, but talk about them in the context of analogue rather than digital. This first article is to focus on three key variables in photography: shutter speed, aperture and ISO (film speed), and the relationship between them.

EXPOSURE

The first thing to understand about these three variables is that if you strip a camera back to its most basic function, shutter speed, aperture and film speed are the only things beyond light itself that you need to understand to take a photo. These three variables amount to what’s called “Exposure”.

Exposure defines how light or dark a photo will be. With there being three variables, the relationship between them is often referred to as the “Exposure Triangle”. By understanding the exposure triangle it is not only possible to achieve correct exposure, but it also opens the up doors to creativity within photography.

It’s worth noting at this stage that the concept of “Correct Exposure” is a very deep hole – so for the sake of this post, let’s just assume we always want to achieve an even distribution of light, mid and dark tones across our photo.  This is about the most simple definition of correct exposure I can think of. As a definition, it overlooks many potential creative goals – but the point is here, to obtain the correct exposure, it is important to understand all three of the key variables, and indeed the relationship between them.

But, before we get to the relationship between them, it’s useful to understand how each one of the variables has a different impact on how your photo will look. To understand how they impact the photo, the best place to start is to understand what they do and how they work.

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Source (https://www.35mmc.com)

Scanning Film With Your DSLR with Matt Day

I've recently changed up my method of scanning film and have been really happy with the results. I went from years of scanning with an Epson V600 to using my Fujifilm X-T3 and a macro lens. Today, I'm breaking down the entire process from start to finish.

I've recently changed up my method of scanning film and have been really happy with the results. I went from years of scanning with an Epson V600 to using my Fujifilm X-T3 and a macro lens. Today, I'm breaking down the entire process from start to finish.

Source (Matt Day Youtube)

VIDEO // Scanning Film With VueScan + Epson Scan Comparison

In this video, I go over my film scanning workflow using VueScan software and an Epson V500 and then compare the results with Epson Scan. I've only been using VueScan for a short period of time, but I've been incredibly happy with the results, and feel like I finally have a workflow for scanning at home that produces the results that I'm after.

Source ( Youtube)

TUTORIAL // Processing Black & White Film

  • We suggest NOT using a squeegee on negatives ...ever.

These simple step by step instructions will teach you all you need to know to start processing your own black & white films at home.

  • Part 1: What you will need 00:09
  • Part 2: Preparing the chemicals 01:06
  • Part 3: Loading your film 02:06
  • Part 4: Processing your film 04:02
  • Part 5: Hanging and Drying your film 06:48

Source (ILFORD Photo Youtube)

VIDEO // PROCESSING B&W

Seeing as a potential Film Workshop is on the cards ...something to wet your appetite ...

These simple step by step instructions will teach you all you need to know to start processing your own black & white films at home.

  • Part 1: What you will need 00:09
  • Part 2: Preparing the chemicals 01:06
  • Part 3: Loading your film 02:06
  • Part 4: Processing your film 04:02
  • Part 5: Hanging and Drying your film

 

Source (V Youtube)

VIDEO // "EDITING AND LAYING OUT A STORY" by Alexi Lubomirski

I like this short vid, it really highlights some great points which can be not only applied to Fashion. When editing any work it is great just to go with your gut and consider relationships that images have with each other ... enough paraphrasing just have a watch and learn from the man himself ... Alexi Lubomirski

Source (Alexi Lubomirski Youtube) (music "LIKE SWIMMING" by Broke For Free @tomcascino)

Working With What You Are Given: 6 Tips for Photographing Light

WORDS AND IMAGES BY MATTHEW PAYNE

We can all appreciate the beauty of the unpredictable – and the weather mama earth chooses to bestow upon us with each day is exactly that – unpredictable. Understanding ever-changing conditions and working with what you're given are skills every photographer hopes to hold within their tool belt. After borrowing a friend's camera in Slovenia 5 years ago, Matthew Payne set out to travel over 50 countries and hasn't put the camera down since. We sat down with Matthew for some insider tips to capture light no matter where the course leads.

01. Time it Right

My absolute favorite time to shoot is in the last hour of daylight. It's a time when the light hits your camera sensor with a softness that no amount of editing can make up for. When shooting in a new location, it's crucial to know where you want to be for the few minutes before the sun breathes its last breath. Research what time the sun will set and time your shots when you can expect light to pour into your frame, hitting the peak of that mountain or spilling into that church.

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Source(http://www.artifactuprising.com/)

 

QUICK TIP # 2

No Frills HEADSHOT With & Without a Reflector

Quick Tip #2 in our ongoing no idea when we finish tutorial tips. So here we are again so the simplest head-shot EVVVER. Once again we have our trusty white wall and reflector. Whip out your camera set it to your largest Aperture you can focus on an eye whack a reflector camera left of light sorce (in this case our shop front window and ......BAAAAAMM.

Above we have no reflector (left) and with a reflector (right). We used the Leica Q set to a 50mm crop which is still a HUGE 8mp capable of 10x8" prints. All ya really need I say. A subtle but pleasing difference. Below is a basic diagram of the shooting location and the light direction

Crop above just for quality purposes. Nice and spanky. Now the final image below after Photoshop and some film emulation (thank you Exposure 7)

Not that it is needed but above is a crop of the eye area, nice and sharp.

QUICK TIP # 1

So, a NEW regular feature which Nick and I have decided to do until we run out of brains. Every Monday  8;35 AM, we will post some random 'QUICK TIP' related to photography. Some lame, some brilliant, stay tuned and without further adieu ...

Harsh Light 30 Second Environmental Portrait

Over breakfast this morning (Sat 7th November) Nick and I decided to put up some quick low-fi photo tip just for kicks. We eventually decided on a Harsh Light Portrait scenario, an obvious problem when you live in sunny QLD. I am certain many of us have wished to take a portrait of someone in the middle of the day; the sun beaming down harsh as ever frying ones retina at any opportunity. You get the general idea.

So what do ya do? Simple, grab a wall in the shade and a reflector (white card whatever), place it on the ground leaning against something so as to angle the sun towards your subject (your bag would be a great leaning post). Fill in the shadows of your subject and shoot away, the rest is Lightroom.

There you have it, couldn't get much simpler really. Remember you can find anything white for a reflector. Hell, even some cardboard painted white or wrapped in cheap-ass silver-foil would do. Above are 3 examples of Nick Bedfords image post processed in Adobe Lighroom CC using the 3 separate VSCO presets.

What a HOOOOOT shot, it's obvious you need awesome models to get the best results.