INTERVIEW // JOEL MEYEROWITZ ON WHAT HE LEARNED ABOUT STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM GARRY WINOGRAND

By David Walker

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“New York City, 1963,” by Joel Meyerowitz. From 1962 to 1965, Meyerowitz and Garry Winogrand “pounded the streets every day” with their cameras cocked and ready, looking for the “fragment of perception that stimulated our consciousness,” Meyerowitz recalls.

When we asked photographers to define “street photography,” they cited the work of several photographers as examples: Helen Levitt, Eugène Atget, Diane Arbus and William Klein, among others. But the photographer most frequently mentioned is Garry Winogrand (1928-1984). To photographers who knew Winogrand personally and those who know him only through his incongruous, witty work, he epitomizes the genre. Photographer...

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Source (https://www.pdnonline.com)

Five Tips from Joel Meyerowitz

Alongside a preview of his new book, ‘Joel Meyerowitz: Where I Find Myself’, the photographer gives us a masterclass in the medium

  • TEXT Douglas Greenwood

 New York City, 1965

New York City, 1965

The street has always been a place where life unfolds unexpectedly. For the past 56 years, American photographer Joel Meyerowitz has tried his best to capture as much of it as he can.

Now considered one of the founding fathers of the medium, Meyerowitz found himself at the epicentre of a movement when he first picked up a camera in early 1960s New York City. Shooting in colour was considered crass back then – used only for commercial purposes – but as it was all that he had to hand, he was able to capture the chaos and jubilance of a generation in crisp, vibrant detail. It would be the start of a highly influential career that saw Meyerowitz create some of the most admired collections of 20th century photography, including Cape Light, his series shot over a summer in Cape Cod, Massachusetts; and his beautiful photos of shorelines at dusk in Bay/Sky.

Joel Meyerowitz: Where I Find Myself is the biggest published retrospective of his photography to date. Presented to the reader in reverse order, it chronicles Meyerowitz’s best work, from his sobering photos of a post-9/11 New York City in mourning to his romantic, mid-20th century shots of the carefree lives of those living in towns and cities across America.

“[It was] a bittersweet and yet fascinating experience to look at 50,000 photographs and say goodbye to most of them,” says Meyerowitz. All of that work brought him to where he is today. Having recently celebrated his 80th birthday, he still continues to take still-life photographs of objects he finds in the junkyards of his Tuscan town.

 New York City, 1975

New York City, 1975

Now, Meyerowitz says times have changed for street photographers – particularly those looking to capture an organic, fleeting moment. “[Back then], you could feel the sensual mix on the street,” he says. “Today, it’s very different. Most people have a cell phone to their ear, or are communicating – they think – with others. They’re somewhat distanced from the real world, so it’s not as sensual, erotic or playful as it used to be.”

That doesn’t mean modern photographers can’t adopt the style to make beautiful pictures, though. Here, Joel Meyerowitz shares five tips on how to take masterful, honest photographs of life on the street.

  1. Be prepared to act on impulse

  2. Ask yourself: ‘What am I doing out here?’

  3. Connect disconnected things

  4. Carve out your identity

  5. Be vocal

Source (http://www.anothermanmag.com)

VIDEO // Scanning Film With VueScan + Epson Scan Comparison

In this video, I go over my film scanning workflow using VueScan software and an Epson V500 and then compare the results with Epson Scan. I've only been using VueScan for a short period of time, but I've been incredibly happy with the results, and feel like I finally have a workflow for scanning at home that produces the results that I'm after.

Source ( Youtube)

VIDEO// Gerda Taro

Today would mark Gerda Taro's 108th Birthday. Gerda Taro was a German war photographer, and the companion and professional partner of photographer Robert Capa. Taro is regarded as the first female photojournalist to cover the front lines of a war and to die while doing so. Wikipedia

Gerda Taro was a pioneering and largely unknown female photojournalist whose work consisted almost exclusively of dramatic photographs from the Spanish Civil War. Irme Schaber, Taro's biographer and curator of the current exhibition at the Barbican will present and talk about a wide selection of Taro's work. Gerda Taro (1910-37) worked alongside Robert Capa, who was her photographic as well as romantic partner and the two collaborated closely. Her photographs were widely reproduced in the French press and incorporated the dynamic camera angles of New Vision photography as well as a physical and emotional closeness to her subject. While covering the crucial battle of Brunete in July 1937, Taro was struck by a tank and killed. Irme Schaber is a writer and lecturer on the history of exile photography, photojournalism and print-media. She is currently researching the work and lives of Hansel Mieth and Otto Hagel, two important German refugee photographers who were some of the earliest photographers for Life magazine.

Source (Frontline Club Youtube)