WECC MEMBER // Nick Bedford - Photo Vol. 120

WECC Member Nick Bedford has posted his latest set of awesome images over at his Journal page at nickbedford.com. Always a treat, his latest film frenzy shows of some great Kodak Portra and Ektar 100 colour work along with the norm Tri-X variants and some Rolleiflex Ilford HP5+ action.. worth a look. ENJOY

Since I seem to be shooting both black and white and colour a lot now, I'm renaming these posts to simply Photo Vol. X. Seems more fitting and flexible. The Rolleiflex has been great, though I need to put it to more use with some Kodak Portra colour film and make some new portraits with it. The Leica M7 is still down in Melbourne at the servicing shop, though I have some recent 35mm Portra 160 photographs from a camping trip I went on with my mate Dash before I sent it away.
We managed to get the Pakon F135+ to scan raw TIFFs of colour film and the results are quite astounding, even despite the limited resolution of the scanner (6 megapixels). The latitude in colour film is amazing.

VIDEO // Photographer PATRICK O'DELL

Many moons ago I stumbled upon this great website www.camerabag.tv. It consisted of a collection of short films on several Photographers, some famous and some not so. I don't know much more about the site as without warning the uploads stopped an as of about a year ago ... it has seaced to exist. 

Although the website has gone I have included below what images I was able to grab before it's demise. We will indevour to upload the remaining 10 shorts over the next 12 months or so

Source (this video originally appeared on www.camerabag.tv)

VIDEO // Testing The Exposure Limits Of Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Pro 400H, Kodak's Portra 400

Fantastic set of vids from Kyle McDougall . Great production value and insightful, Make certain to Subscribe to his Youtube channel.

Colour Negative Film exposure tests,  looking at Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Pro 400H and Kodak's Portra 400. 

Source (Kyle McDougall Youtube)

INTERVIEW // Photographer Iain Sarjeant

By Grant Scott

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Iain Sarjeant is a photographer based in the Highlands of Scotland who founded the Another Place Press as a small independent publisher to showcase contemporary landscape photography. To date he has published nine books that explore landscape covering themes documenting the land, place, journey, city and environment from the remotest corners of the globe to the centre of the largest cities. It’s an ambitious premise and even more so as the imprint consists of just one employee. Iain is that employee and his responsibilities include all aspects of publishing the books, running the blog, all social media and continuing to work as a commissioned photographer as well as progressing his personal projects. Despite this he spared sometime to talk with Grant Scott about the current independent publishing landscape and his personal experiences in establishing his own publishing company.

Grant: I hear and read a lot of discussion amongst photographers about photobooks but very little about publishing, which is something we are all doing every day even if we are not aware of it. Every time we write a tweet or post on Facebook or Instagram we are publishing, but the art and complexity of publishing is rarely understood. I’m also not sure if photographers are comfortable with being referred to as publishers.
Iain: It’s become relatively easy to produce a photobook which is exciting, but I think there is a need to think through the process carefully, in particular how to sell decent quantities of a book, if that is the goal. In many ways, the marketing and selling is the most challenging part of the process. I have a background in graphic design and a knowledge of the print and design process – I am comfortable handling everything in-house and have decent connections with printers, but I’m no publishing expert. Another Place Press developed out of the Another Place blog, which I started a few years ago, and right from the start I hoped that it would develop into a publishing project. I was inspired by small publishers such as The Velvet Cell www.thevelvetcell.com, I loved what they do – Eanna has a real eye for design. I also feel design is very important – of course a book needs a strong series of photographs that work well, but you cannot underestimate the importance of design.

Grant: There seems to be a strong collaborative sense amongst independent publishers.
Iain: Absolutely, Eanna, the founder of The Velvet Cell was very supportive in helping me establish Another Place even though I could be seen as a potential competitor. Craig Atkinson at Café Royal is producing great books and I know Al Palmer at Brown Owl Press, but there are not that many publishers releasing the kind of small books we are producing. I started with small books partly for financial reasons, but I do like their size – good quality small books produced at a reasonable price that everyone can afford. I very much like the idea of them being affordable, accessible to all.

READ & SEE MORE

Source (https://unitednationsofphotography.com)

BOOK REVIEW // CAFE ROYAL BOOKS - Bill Jay — British Photographers Photographed

PURCHASE

Published to accompany the documentary film and exhibition: Do Not Bend: The Photographic Life of Bill Jay

BOOK REVIEW // La Calle: On the Streets of Mexico

Photographs by Alex Webb
Review by Sean Sheehan

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Since joining Magnum Photos at the age of 24, Alex Webb has certainly kept himself busy. This latest volume, a handsomely produced book containing 86 photographs, gathers together work produced by Webb over the course of his numerous trips to Mexico between 1975 and 2007.

For those unfamiliar with Webb’s oeuvre, the book contains eight uncharacteristically black-and-white photographs—surprising, given Webb’s love of color. Yet these are important examples of Webb’s early work, the kind that first attracted the attention of Magnum when he was beginning his career. Despite their simplicity, it is not difficult to see what caught their attention: take his 1978 shot of a graveyard, with a boy in the foreground addressing the camera and two riders on one horse cantering by in the background. Fresh floral wreaths indicate memories of those buried here, but a cross is slowly collapsing into the ground and an old shack looks disused; memories also die, in time, and the realm of the eternally departed is framed by the temporality of the two riders and the boy who questions the viewer’s intrusive presence.

READ & SEE MORE

Source (https://www.lensculture.com

PHOTOGRAPHER // Adrien Blondel

 I work predominantly with the photographic medium, and recently with analog photography almost exclusively. The analog process has been a great source of learning to me,  and I find it has a certain depth, a weight, that digital images don’t carry in the same way.  Adrien Blondel
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It is a common thing to think about the bedroom in which one grew up, scattered memories of a time cherished or loathed, but essential, the private space of self-development.

Most people move out and away from their childhood room, and seldom keep a link to this space, other than in their memory or photographs, where space itself is often just the background.

For some, the room has barely changed since they lived in it, and it is as if the memories settled, like dust, the room remains suspended in time, a personal museum. For others, the room has been entirely remodeled, keeping almost no traces of the memories evoked.

This series is a playful attempt at reversing the concept of photography as the representation of something that is no longer, by presenting people’s memory of their childhood bedroom, collected as an interview, with a photograph of what the room is now, creating an image that contradicts the memories evoked, and the visualization that comes from hearing them. The photographs were taken after the interview, in the hope that, consciously or not, the image will reflect on the memories that were evoked, and point at how a human presence in a place possibly leaves it changed. This process tries to acknowledge the layers present in a room, the never-ending creation of memories linked to a given space and the multitudes that pass through it, and maybe the sum of all of those memories tells us about the essence of a space. 

WEBSITE

TUTORIAL // Processing Black & White Film

  • We suggest NOT using a squeegee on negatives ...ever.

These simple step by step instructions will teach you all you need to know to start processing your own black & white films at home.

  • Part 1: What you will need 00:09
  • Part 2: Preparing the chemicals 01:06
  • Part 3: Loading your film 02:06
  • Part 4: Processing your film 04:02
  • Part 5: Hanging and Drying your film 06:48

Source (ILFORD Photo Youtube)

INTERVIEW // Photographer Yukio Uchida

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Over the last few years, Fujifilm has invited professional photographers from around the world to meet with the product planning and R&D teams to discuss current and future products. Names you may or may not have heard of such as Zack Arias, David Hobby, Bert Stephani, Kevin Mullins, Gianluca Colla, Tomasz Lazar, Damien Lovegrove, Knut Koivisto, Chris Weston and more have all given their feedback and input into the “kai-zen” development mentality of the Fujifilm X system.

However, this process has actually been going on for longer than that.

Earlier in the year I was lucky enough to meet with Yukio Uchida, a famous professional photographer from Japan who had been speaking about Fujifilm cameras at the CP+ show in Yokohama. Yukio was one of the world’s first “X-Photographers”; his feedback has been instrumental in the development of the Fujifilm X system. I was able to get 10 minutes of his time to ask him a few questions about his involvement with Fujifilm R&D, and also his own photographic style.

MH: Thank you for taking some time meet me and talk about you and your photography.
Is this your first time presenting at CP+?

YU: No, this is my fourth year. Every year it gets better than previous. Four years ago very few people used X series but over time the amount of users has increased, and also the amount of people that come to watch me speak has increased.

READ& SEE MORE

Source (https://fujifilm-blog.com)