INTERVIEW // Photographer Yukio Uchida

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Over the last few years, Fujifilm has invited professional photographers from around the world to meet with the product planning and R&D teams to discuss current and future products. Names you may or may not have heard of such as Zack Arias, David Hobby, Bert Stephani, Kevin Mullins, Gianluca Colla, Tomasz Lazar, Damien Lovegrove, Knut Koivisto, Chris Weston and more have all given their feedback and input into the “kai-zen” development mentality of the Fujifilm X system.

However, this process has actually been going on for longer than that.

Earlier in the year I was lucky enough to meet with Yukio Uchida, a famous professional photographer from Japan who had been speaking about Fujifilm cameras at the CP+ show in Yokohama. Yukio was one of the world’s first “X-Photographers”; his feedback has been instrumental in the development of the Fujifilm X system. I was able to get 10 minutes of his time to ask him a few questions about his involvement with Fujifilm R&D, and also his own photographic style.

MH: Thank you for taking some time meet me and talk about you and your photography.
Is this your first time presenting at CP+?

YU: No, this is my fourth year. Every year it gets better than previous. Four years ago very few people used X series but over time the amount of users has increased, and also the amount of people that come to watch me speak has increased.

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Source (https://fujifilm-blog.com)

INTERVIEW // 14 REASONS TO SWITCH BACK TO FILM

Ryan Neilan talks about the freeing experience of film

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Deep blacks, blown highlights, contrast heavy. Heavily influenced by the Are-Bure-Boke style from Japan, Ryan Neilan’s images are often out of focus, blurry and feature lots of heavy grain. Having shot his first roll of film back in 1999, Neilan would take pictures of his friends’ band playing in a local community center. And as he would describe it, the process of knowing how to obtain a good image got him hooked and he has been doing photography ever since. He shares his experience of changing 100% back from digital to analog and how Leica has played a key role in this unraveling process.

What approach do you take with your photography or what does photography mean to you?

I’ve always enjoyed art and music, but I have never been able to draw, to really learn an instrument well. It just didn’t click with me. But when I look at a picture, a good photograph, there’s just a feeling you get. It just clicks. I’m sure it’s the same for guitarists and painters, they just have a connection with that art form. For me it just happens to be photography.

My approach is perhaps a little different to most. I shoot film and shoot a lot of film. I shot forty rolls in five days in Tokyo. When I go out to shoot I walk quickly. I like to move quickly through the streets and people. I stop for a split second to press the shutter, barely breaking stride before moving on. I rarely talk to the people I photograph, usually I’m long gone before they have a chance to react. I can easily shoot three to five rolls in an hour and thanks to the 35mm I’m trying to get closer as I shoot.

I have stopped going out to randomly shoot as I used to and am now really focusing on projects. After the Tokyo project, my next project is based in Ho Chi Minh City. The images you see of the city are usually the over done, overly pretty tourist shots. I don’t think anyone has ever really shot this city in this darker black and white style before. I have another project in the works on the growing hardcore punk music scene that is growing here in Saigon.

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Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com)

LOCAL NEWS // Racquet Film Public Darkroom FUNDRAISER

We at WECC have been great fans of everything Racquet Films do, and getting a Public Darkroom off the ground is something we are going to cheer and yell about. With a few more "secrets" in the works, this is just the start of what we hope is a great ANALOG revival for all Brisbane Film Fans. We call all to arms and encourage all FILM shooters to help get this well-needed service off the ground ....workshop anyone.

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Racquet Film began as a comission-free agency to help photographers make more money without paying fees. We've since expanded rapidly, with the opening of our full service lab (C41, B&W, E6 in 135, 120 and 220 formats, all done in-house). The demand for a public darkroom has become apparent, and the building directly next door of Racquet Film's lab and gallery is currently on hold. Racquet Film are willing to match the amount donated to cover the $18,000 bill to rent the space, and are taking donations to build a pro-grade darkroom that the entire Brisbane community can use. We'd be so greatful for any donation, big or small, whether it be money or darkroom equipment. Having spent four months in the shop, we've witnessed first hand the growth of film in Brisbane, and we want to continue to nurture this advancement, and think the expansion of services for the Racquet community is an amazing way to do this. 

100% of the funds will go toward darkroom equipment, associated bills and the other expenses it takes to make a professional darkroom worthy of public use. As previously mentioned, any donations would be greatly appreciated, and we are truly passionate about advancing film photography in Brisbane (the old school way).

Thanks in advance for your support, and feel free to contact us with any questions or suggestions.

DONATE NOW

PHOTOGRAPHER // Olivia Arthur

Interview by Helena Lee

Olivia Arthur is a British documentary photographer and member of the Magnum photography agency. Originally studying mathematics at Oxford University she later studied photojournalism at the London College of Printing. .. Wikipedea

Bazaar: What draws you to photojournalism?  

Olivia: It’s photography with more story telling. A single image can be amazing and dramatic. I started out shooting individual images for Cherwell [Oxford’s student newspaper], but I found I wanted to have more of a voice: to actually say something. I wanted to do something more personal over a long period of time, with more authorship.

Bazaar: What’s the story you are most proud of telling?

Olivia: Jeddah Diary is my first book, so I am proud of that. It was also the first time I’ve worked with both words and photographs successfully. Saudi Arabia is so conservative. At first there were photographs of women I took that I couldn’t publish – of women without their abayas [the cloak they must wear in public]. So I started writing out little anecdotes about things I couldn’t photograph and wove it in with a more obscure picture and called it “moments that got away”. I realised these worked as well as the photographs by themselves. There are a lot of photographers who feel the story is all in the photographs but I really believe in weaving in complementary words with the pictures.

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WEBSITE | MAGNUM

Source (http://www.harpersbazaar.com

INTERVIEW // Photographer Paul Struijk by Pete Littlewood

Paul Struijk explores the facial architecture of the Dutch capital with his Leica M10

Amsterdam is one of the most culturally diverse cities you will find anywhere on the planet. It was among the most important ports in the world during the Dutch Golden Age of the 17th Century and ever since then immigrants from all over the globe have come to call Amsterdam their home. Amsterdamer, Paul Struijk, set out with his LeicaM10 to document the facial archetypes of the city’s residents and, in doing so, captured the diverse yet kindred nature of humanity in all its forms.

You studied an array of subjects from biology to archaeology and even classical dance. What was it that drew you to photography?

It was the creativity of the work. I needed to create things from the inside out and have the freedom to choose what I do. I also wanted to encounter new worlds, new people and new ideas.

How would you describe your photographic style?

My aim is to document. I try to find authentic images with a mix of old school and modern approaches. I like real life. I love people and how they try to make the best of it. I am absolutely a color person but over the last 2 years with my Leica, my photography has become more and more monochrome but always with a little shade of color, a little hint of a tone.

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Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com)

"Great Journeys" Magnum Photos Square Print Sale with Aperture Foundation

October 30, 8 A.M. EST to November 3, 6 P.M. EST only
Signed or estate-stamped, 6x6" museum quality prints for $100

Band member at parade. Bangalore, India. 2016 © Alec Soth / Magnum Photos

I recently went to India to study ‘laughter yoga’ in hopes of learning how to make happy pictures. But my best photograph still ended up looking a little sad.” - Alec Soth

On the occasion of Magnum’s 70th anniversary and Aperture Foundation’s 65th, the two storied organizations have joined forces to present Great Journeys, inspired by Magnum co-founder, the photographer George Rodger.

Rodger’s response to the experience of World War II, and in particular his revulsion to photographing scenes of the Holocaust, led him to re-evaluate his purpose as a photographer. After the war, Rodger chose to travel in search of pictures that offered visions of hope for humanity.

Cheshire, Ohio II. 2004 © Mitch Epstein courtesy Aperture

I went to Cheshire, Ohio, in 2003 to make pictures of a town that had been bought out by American Electric Power. The townspeople had been complaining of toxic contamination from the local coal-fired power plant, and had agreed, for a price, to keep silent and never sue AEP. It was when I returned home to New York, and couldn’t get Cheshire and its residents out of my mind, that I began the series ‘American Power,’ in an effort to understand how energy functions: who makes it; who and what gets hurt by it; who profits from it; and what might be its, and therefore the nation’s, future.” - Mitch Epstein

Magnum Photos and Aperture have a long and diverse shared history, and together have invited photographers - either members of Magnum or published by Aperture, and often, both - to respond to the theme Great Journeys with an image from their archive, as well as accompanying text.

Scotty’s Drive in. Florida. 1967 © Joel Meyerowitz courtesy Aperture

Here’s Scotty’s Sometimes when you’re traveling in the car all day, on the lookout for life on the fly, a great thirst comes over you and that desire for the next event evaporates immediately upon seeing an old-fashioned diner, I mean the real thing, not some dolled-up imitation serving prepackaged crap, but a place where some degree of reverence for the past lets you know that a milkshake from childhood can be found there. And here’s Scotty’s. Mmmmmm”

Both individually and collectively, their responses highlight the major visual and thematic threads that have preoccupied the past seven decades of photographic production, shedding light on Rodger’s legacy, and redefining the concept of journey in photographic terms.

These photographs are a selection from this project and is temporarily available for purchase as a signed, museum quality Magnum Square Print, exceptionally priced at just $100.

Liberation Day Tea at the Forest United Methodist Church. Guernsey. 2012 © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos

The Channel Islands were the only part of Britain that were taken over by the Nazis during the Second World War. They were liberated on May 9, 1945: This day is now called Liberation Day and continues to be celebrated on all of the islands every year. I had wanted to shoot the events around May 9 in the Channel Islands for many years and did so in 2012, travelling to the Islands to make pictures of the 68th anniversary celebrations of the liberation. This is an image from a 'Liberation Tea' at a small Methodist church on Guernsey, a day when Union Jacks are ubiquitous.” - Martin Parr

The edition is not limited by quantity, but limited by time. This Square Print is only available for purchase between October 30, 2017, at 8 A.M. EST and November 3, 2017, at 6 P.M. EST.

All signed Magnum Square Prints are signed on either the front or back, depending on the photographer's preference. Estate-stamped prints are stamped on the back. Each photographer's accompanying text is printed on an archival label that is affixed to the back of the print.

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