Five Tips from Joel Meyerowitz

Alongside a preview of his new book, ‘Joel Meyerowitz: Where I Find Myself’, the photographer gives us a masterclass in the medium

  • TEXT Douglas Greenwood

 New York City, 1965

New York City, 1965

The street has always been a place where life unfolds unexpectedly. For the past 56 years, American photographer Joel Meyerowitz has tried his best to capture as much of it as he can.

Now considered one of the founding fathers of the medium, Meyerowitz found himself at the epicentre of a movement when he first picked up a camera in early 1960s New York City. Shooting in colour was considered crass back then – used only for commercial purposes – but as it was all that he had to hand, he was able to capture the chaos and jubilance of a generation in crisp, vibrant detail. It would be the start of a highly influential career that saw Meyerowitz create some of the most admired collections of 20th century photography, including Cape Light, his series shot over a summer in Cape Cod, Massachusetts; and his beautiful photos of shorelines at dusk in Bay/Sky.

Joel Meyerowitz: Where I Find Myself is the biggest published retrospective of his photography to date. Presented to the reader in reverse order, it chronicles Meyerowitz’s best work, from his sobering photos of a post-9/11 New York City in mourning to his romantic, mid-20th century shots of the carefree lives of those living in towns and cities across America.

“[It was] a bittersweet and yet fascinating experience to look at 50,000 photographs and say goodbye to most of them,” says Meyerowitz. All of that work brought him to where he is today. Having recently celebrated his 80th birthday, he still continues to take still-life photographs of objects he finds in the junkyards of his Tuscan town.

 New York City, 1975

New York City, 1975

Now, Meyerowitz says times have changed for street photographers – particularly those looking to capture an organic, fleeting moment. “[Back then], you could feel the sensual mix on the street,” he says. “Today, it’s very different. Most people have a cell phone to their ear, or are communicating – they think – with others. They’re somewhat distanced from the real world, so it’s not as sensual, erotic or playful as it used to be.”

That doesn’t mean modern photographers can’t adopt the style to make beautiful pictures, though. Here, Joel Meyerowitz shares five tips on how to take masterful, honest photographs of life on the street.

  1. Be prepared to act on impulse

  2. Ask yourself: ‘What am I doing out here?’

  3. Connect disconnected things

  4. Carve out your identity

  5. Be vocal

Source (http://www.anothermanmag.com)

VIDEO // Scanning Film With VueScan + Epson Scan Comparison

In this video, I go over my film scanning workflow using VueScan software and an Epson V500 and then compare the results with Epson Scan. I've only been using VueScan for a short period of time, but I've been incredibly happy with the results, and feel like I finally have a workflow for scanning at home that produces the results that I'm after.

Source ( Youtube)

VIDEO// Gerda Taro

Today would mark Gerda Taro's 108th Birthday. Gerda Taro was a German war photographer, and the companion and professional partner of photographer Robert Capa. Taro is regarded as the first female photojournalist to cover the front lines of a war and to die while doing so. Wikipedia

Gerda Taro was a pioneering and largely unknown female photojournalist whose work consisted almost exclusively of dramatic photographs from the Spanish Civil War. Irme Schaber, Taro's biographer and curator of the current exhibition at the Barbican will present and talk about a wide selection of Taro's work. Gerda Taro (1910-37) worked alongside Robert Capa, who was her photographic as well as romantic partner and the two collaborated closely. Her photographs were widely reproduced in the French press and incorporated the dynamic camera angles of New Vision photography as well as a physical and emotional closeness to her subject. While covering the crucial battle of Brunete in July 1937, Taro was struck by a tank and killed. Irme Schaber is a writer and lecturer on the history of exile photography, photojournalism and print-media. She is currently researching the work and lives of Hansel Mieth and Otto Hagel, two important German refugee photographers who were some of the earliest photographers for Life magazine.

Source (Frontline Club Youtube)

INTERVIEW // Photographer Armin Walcher

by PETE LITTLEWOOD

Zeitlos in Bewegung – © Armin Walcher Photography 3.jpg

The Ausseerland, in the geographical middle of Austria, is an area of outstanding natural beauty with its crystal clear lakes and impressive mountain backdrops. Beneath its picture-postcard appearance, the region and its inhabitants preserve a strong sense of tradition and heritage, while equally embracing change and progression. Austrian Leica S photographer Armin Walcher explores this fascinating region in search of the hard-to-pin-down sense of local identity via 30 in-depth encounters with local craftspeople, musicians, and artists. The personal stories are told via images and text in the beautifully compiled book “Zeitlos in Bewegung”, while an interactive website includes compelling videos, offering more insight into the 30 individual stories. Here we feature just a few of these local characters and speak with Armin about the challenges of capturing such an elusive concept as local identity in photographic form.

 © Armin Walcher Photography

© Armin Walcher Photography

You used to be a professional athlete before you became a photographer, how did you transition from one career to the next?

It was more or less by accident. During my career as a professional athlete, I wanted to update my website with better photos. So I bought a better camera. I immediately fell in love with the feeling of photography, which I had not been able to imagine before. I really got obsessed and started to do more and more and more…

 © Armin Walcher Photography

© Armin Walcher Photography

How did your passion for photography develop? Is there anyone in particular, who influenced or inspired you along the way?

The development went from nature to sports, then to commercial, people and documentary photography. It was a process, I would say. I had to grow as a person to go more into people and documentary photography. I could not imagine that when I started to shoot. It took me some time.

Nature photography is still a learning process for me. I gain new insights each time I shoot, I keep discovering new things and I appreciate it if situations have meaning in an honest way, not in a spectacular one.

I learn a lot from each kind of photography, which keeps my life and my life as a photographer in fascinating movement. I don’t want to stand still. I want to develop. I can’t say who influenced or inspired me in particular, but my dad is a big part of my career in photography. He loves photography and always has honest feedback.

READ & SEE MORE

Source (http://blog.leica-camera.com

WECC MEMBER // Nick Bedford - Photo Vol. 120

WECC Member Nick Bedford has posted his latest set of awesome images over at his Journal page at nickbedford.com. Always a treat, his latest film frenzy shows of some great Kodak Portra and Ektar 100 colour work along with the norm Tri-X variants and some Rolleiflex Ilford HP5+ action.. worth a look. ENJOY

Since I seem to be shooting both black and white and colour a lot now, I'm renaming these posts to simply Photo Vol. X. Seems more fitting and flexible. The Rolleiflex has been great, though I need to put it to more use with some Kodak Portra colour film and make some new portraits with it. The Leica M7 is still down in Melbourne at the servicing shop, though I have some recent 35mm Portra 160 photographs from a camping trip I went on with my mate Dash before I sent it away.
We managed to get the Pakon F135+ to scan raw TIFFs of colour film and the results are quite astounding, even despite the limited resolution of the scanner (6 megapixels). The latitude in colour film is amazing.

VIDEO // Photographer PATRICK O'DELL

Many moons ago I stumbled upon this great website www.camerabag.tv. It consisted of a collection of short films on several Photographers, some famous and some not so. I don't know much more about the site as without warning the uploads stopped an as of about a year ago ... it has seaced to exist. 

Although the website has gone I have included below what images I was able to grab before it's demise. We will indevour to upload the remaining 10 shorts over the next 12 months or so

Source (this video originally appeared on www.camerabag.tv)

VIDEO // Testing The Exposure Limits Of Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Pro 400H, Kodak's Portra 400

Fantastic set of vids from Kyle McDougall . Great production value and insightful, Make certain to Subscribe to his Youtube channel.

Colour Negative Film exposure tests,  looking at Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Pro 400H and Kodak's Portra 400. 

Source (Kyle McDougall Youtube)